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AFL 2022: Jesinta Franklin speaks about Indigenous deaths in custody


Buddy Franklin’s wife Jesinta says ‘the justice system in this country is broken’ as she promotes documentary about Indigenous deaths in custody


Jesinta Franklin, the model wife of Indigenous AFL star Buddy Franklin, has spoken out about the mistreatment of Indigenous people in custody.

She criticised the Australian justice system in a post on Instagram after watching a hard-hitting documentary about racial injustice called Unheard.

‘Tonight we started watching Unheard on Amazon Prime… The justice system in this country is broken,’ she wrote.

Speaking out: Jesinta Franklin, the model wife of Indigenous AFL star Buddy Franklin, has spoken out about the mistreatment of Indigenous people in custody. Pictured on December 1

Speaking out: Jesinta Franklin, the model wife of Indigenous AFL star Buddy Franklin, has spoken out about the mistreatment of Indigenous people in custody. Pictured on December 1 

‘This series is a must watch. It will make you uncomfortable and break your heart. It may even open your eyes to the racism that people face in this country,’ she added.

Jesinta explained: ‘The first two episodes are based on Indigenous Australians. It also covers stories from Muslim women, asylum seekers, refugees and the last episode explores the story of two Australians of African decent. This is essential viewing.’

Five hundred Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have died in custody in Australia in the 30 years since the 1991 royal commission, reports The Guardian.  

Important: She criticised the Australian justice system in a post on Instagram after watching a hard-hitting documentary about racial injustice called Unheard

Important: She criticised the Australian justice system in a post on Instagram after watching a hard-hitting documentary about racial injustice called Unheard

'The justice system in this country is broken': Five hundred Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have died in custody in the 30 years since the 1991 royal commission

‘The justice system in this country is broken’: Five hundred Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have died in custody in the 30 years since the 1991 royal commission

It comes after the mother of two penned a column for Stellar magazine in 2020 explaining why she refused to celebrate Australia Day on January 26. 

‘I have seen my husband well up when talking about his mum [Ursula] and how she used to have to run away with her siblings when they knew the government trucks were coming to take them away from their parents,’ she wrote in reference to the Stolen Generations.

The Stolen Generations saw Aboriginal children forcibly removed from their families communities due to racist government policies.

It was hearing painful stories from her husband’s family that made Jesinta realise the importance of changing the date from January 26 – the day in 1788 when Arthur Phillip raised the Union Jack at Sydney Cove.

Protest: It comes after the mother of two penned a column for Stellar magazine in 2020 explaining why she refused to celebrate Australia Day on January 26. Pictured in 2018

Protest: It comes after the mother of two penned a column for Stellar magazine in 2020 explaining why she refused to celebrate Australia Day on January 26. Pictured in 2018

‘While I had read and learnt about the horrors of Australia’s past, it wasn’t until I listened to the pain endured from someone close to me that I began to deeply feel the importance of changing the date,’ she wrote.

She added that Buddy’s sisters had shared stories of their grandparents, who were ‘born into a world that considered them flora and fauna’.

Jesinta said the date needed to be moved to one that celebrates ‘all Aussies’ and ‘doesn’t hold so much hurt for so many people’. 

Heartbreaking: It was hearing painful stories from her husband's family about the Stolen Generations that made Jesinta realise the importance of changing the date from January 26 - the day in 1788 when Arthur Phillip raised the Union Jack at Sydney Cove

Heartbreaking: It was hearing painful stories from her husband’s family about the Stolen Generations that made Jesinta realise the importance of changing the date from January 26 – the day in 1788 when Arthur Phillip raised the Union Jack at Sydney Cove

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