Sunday, October 2, 2022
HomeTv & ShowLove Island Australia: Anna McEvoy taken to hospital with a severe infection

Love Island Australia: Anna McEvoy taken to hospital with a severe infection


Love Island Australia star Anna McEvoy is rushed to hospital after a common health problem turned into a ‘bad infection’

Love Island Australia’s Anna McEvoy has updated fans about her recent health scare.

The reality star, 30, revealed on Tuesday she’d been rushed to hospital after her UTI developed into a serious kidney infection.

Anna had spent the previous few days documenting her efforts to find out what was wrong with her, including various visits to doctors.

Love Island Australia's Anna McEvoy has updated fans about her recent health scare

Love Island Australia’s Anna McEvoy has updated fans about her recent health scare 

‘Today I got an ultrasound, three urine tests, STD tests, a blood test and antibiotics haven’t fixed or come up with what’s actually going on,’ she said on Instagram. 

‘Still feel like I need to go to the toilet every five seconds [and it is] painful to wee! So hoping this gives me some answers because this constant pain is becoming unbearable.’

Anna later told her followers the pain had worsened and she was in hospital, before confirming her diagnosis in a subsequent post.

The reality star, 30, revealed on Tuesday she'd been rushed to hospital after her UTI developed into a serious kidney infection

The reality star, 30, revealed on Tuesday she’d been rushed to hospital after her UTI developed into a serious kidney infection 

‘Update: Back/side pain got really bad last night as well as the burning pain in my wee. Didn’t sleep much. So getting it checked out at the hospital,’ she wrote.

‘I have a UTI that has turned into a bad KIDNEY INFECTION. Apparently the last doctor missed the white blood cells in my urine. FML [f**k my life].

‘To be honest I’m just grateful to know at this point.’

Anna had spent the previous few days documenting her efforts to find out what was wrong with her, including various visits to doctors (pictured)

WHAT IS A URINARY TRACT INFECTION (UTI)?

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can affect different parts of your urinary tract, including your bladder (cystitis), urethra (urethritis) or kidneys (kidney infection). 

Most UTIs can be easily treated with antibiotics. 

Symptoms of a UTI include:

  • needing to pee suddenly or more often than usual
  • pain or a burning sensation when peeing
  • smelly or cloudy pee
  • blood in your pee
  • pain in your lower tummy
  • feeling tired and unwell
  • in older people, changes in behaviour such as severe confusion or agitation

Children with UTIs may also:

  • appear generally unwell – babies may be irritable, not feed properly and have a high temperature of 37.5C or above
  • wet the bed or wet themselves
  • deliberately hold in their pee because it stings  

Treating urinary tract infections (UTIs)

Your doctor or nurse may prescribe antibiotics to treat a UTI.

Once you start treatment, the symptoms should start to clear up within five days in adults and 2 days in children.  

If your UTI comes back any time after treatment, you’ll usually be prescribed a longer course of antibiotics. 

Things you can do yourself

Mild urinary tract infections (UTIs) often pass within a few days. To help ease pain while your symptoms clear up:

  • take paracetamol – you can give children liquid paracetamol
  • place a hot water bottle on your tummy, back or between your thighs
  • rest and drink plenty of fluids – this helps your body to flush out the bacteria

It may also help to avoid having sex until you feel better.

You cannot pass a UTI on to your partner, but sex may be uncomfortable.

Causes of urinary tract infections (UTIs)

UTIs are usually caused by bacteria from poo entering the urinary tract.

The bacteria enter through the tube that carries pee out of the body (urethra).

Women have a shorter urethra than men. This means bacteria are more likely to reach the bladder or kidneys and cause an infection.

Causes of UTIs include:

  • pregnancy
  • conditions that block the urinary tract – such as kidney stones
  • conditions that make it difficult to fully empty the bladder – such as an enlarged prostate gland in men and constipation in children
  • urinary catheters (a tube in your bladder used to drain urine)
  • having a weakened immune system – for example, from type 2 diabetes, chemotherapy or HIV

She was discharged from hospital hours after doctors found the cause of her symptoms and prescribed appropriate medication.

Her partner Michael Staples later confirmed she was on the mend, joking on Instagram: ‘Look who is back from hospital. Kidney infection: 0, Anna: 1.’

The Love Island season two winner also said she felt very lucky ‘to have found out what was going on’.

Anna’s infection comes just days after she and Michael celebrated their one-year anniversary. The pair went out for dinner at Marriott Hotel Docklands in Melbourne.

Anna (right, with her boyfriend Michael) was discharged from hospital hours after doctors found the cause of her symptoms and prescribed appropriate medication

Anna (right, with her boyfriend Michael) was discharged from hospital hours after doctors found the cause of her symptoms and prescribed appropriate medication 

Her partner Michael Staples later confirmed she was on the mend, joking on Instagram: 'Look who is back from hospital. Kidney infection: 0, Anna: 1'

Her partner Michael Staples later confirmed she was on the mend, joking on Instagram: ‘Look who is back from hospital. Kidney infection: 0, Anna: 1’ 

Advertisement

RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisment -

Most Popular

Recent Comments