Tuesday, August 16, 2022
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Molly-Mae Hague opts for bridal chic in slinky white gown as she poses on beach in Mexico


She’s been living a life of luxury while on a lavish work trip to Mexico.

And Molly-Mae Hague, 22, very nearly looked like a blushing bride as she posed on a sandy beach in a beautiful white satin gown in an Instagram shot on Sunday.

The former Love Island star, who is dating her 2019 series co-star Tommy Fury, 22, captioned her post: ‘Not all storms come to disrupt your life… some come to clear your path.’

Innocence: Molly-Mae Hague, 22, very nearly looked like a blushing bride as she posed on a sandy beach in a beautiful white satin gown in an Instagram shot on Sunday

Innocence: Molly-Mae Hague, 22, very nearly looked like a blushing bride as she posed on a sandy beach in a beautiful white satin gown in an Instagram shot on Sunday

The television personality’s dress clung to her frame, accentuating her shapely curves.

Her naked arms and shoulders were left exposed to the warm tropical air and her cleavage was on show due to the garment’s plunging neckline.

She carried a Dior handbag with her and accessorised with with some gold pendulum earrings to compliment her blonde locks which she wore in an up do.

Keeping it real: Molly-Mae bravely showed off the scar where she had a lump removed from her breast after cancer scare on Saturday

Keeping it real: Molly-Mae bravely showed off the scar where she had a lump removed from her breast after cancer scare on Saturday 

Molly-Mae wore lashings of make-up to highlight her pretty facial features and sported a healthy tan.

The waves crashed on the shore behind her as a storm passed in the distance with rain falling to the ground.

In a separate Instagram post on Saturday, the influencer showed off the scar where she had a lump removed from her breast after a cancer scare.

Brave: The influencer revealed the mark as she posed in a black bikini on her social media during a work trip to Mexico

Brave: The influencer revealed the mark as she posed in a black bikini on her social media during a work trip to Mexico

Molly revealed the mark as she posed in a black bikini on her social media during her trip.

Molly-Mae had surgery to remove the benign lump after a biopsy revealed it had grown in size, with the star previously saying it ‘felt like a golf ball’.

The blonde beauty took to Instagram to share a snap of herself relaxing by the pool in an idyllic tropical spot as she wore a black bikini top and white shorts.  

She then posted a zoomed up image on her Instagram Story and wrote in the caption: ‘Little lump removal scar, grown to like it’ along with a love heart emoji.

Heaven on earth: The former Love Island star also took to Instagram to share a glimpse of her day relaxing by the pool in an idyllic tropical spot this weekend

Heaven on earth: The former Love Island star also took to Instagram to share a glimpse of her day relaxing by the pool in an idyllic tropical spot this weekend

It comes after last month Molly-Mae discussed the moment she found a lump on her breast, saying it was the size of a ‘golf ball’.

The former Love Island star previously had surgery in September to remove a lump after a biopsy revealed it had gown in size.

Taking to her Instagram Stories in February, Molly-Mae told of her experience as she answered a fan who said she had also recently found a lump. 

Molly-Mae said: ‘This is obviously a really serious one. I’m really sorry that you found a lump. I know it can be so scary. I was literally in bed when I found mine.

Beauty: Molly-Mae also shared a glimpse of the resort she was staying in as she went outside and relaxed by the pool on Saturday

Looking good: The star displayed her bronzed hue

Beauty: Molly-Mae also shared a glimpse of the resort she was staying in as she went outside and relaxed by the pool on Saturday

‘I was like lying in bed with Tommy [Fury] and sort of lying really far back and sort of went like that [cupped side] on my boob and I literally felt it.

‘Honestly, I think when you find a lump you sort of think, “how have I not felt this before?”

‘It must have come around so quickly, how have I not noticed it before? Mine was literally, it felt like a literal golf ball. It felt huge. 

‘Actually at first they recommended that I didn’t have the lump removed at all. They said it was something called a fibroadenoma and it’s benign and not serious, but I think that as a woman to have to just live with a huge lump in your boob, for me it just didn’t sit right.’

Molly-Mae said that she kept pushing to have the lump removed and captioned the clip: ‘Check your boobs!’

She said: ‘I think when you know something is not right with your body you just know and I didn’t want to just sit and wait for years to come for the lump to potentially turn into something sinister.’ 

It came after Molly-Mae previously had surgery to remove the ‘benign’ lump in her breast and a separate mass in her finger. 

The influencer shared pictures from her hospital bed in September as he revealed she had undergone the procedure.

Candid: It comes after last month Molly-Mae discussed the moment she found a lump on her breast, saying it was the size of a 'golf ball'

Candid: It comes after last month Molly-Mae discussed the moment she found a lump on her breast, saying it was the size of a ‘golf ball’

Alongside the snap, she wrote: ‘I spoke about a lump I found in my boob on a recent vlog of mine, well I had it removed today. Check your bodies people!!’ 

Further updating her fans, Molly-Mae said: ‘Also had a lump removed from my finger that I’ve spoken about a few times too.’

‘Also having a canula put in my hand has always been without a doubt my BIGGEST fear… so that in itself today is a HUGE achievement for me.’ 

Molly-Mae previously said on her YouTube channel that she’d been referred for a biopsy after discovering a benign lump in her breast had grown, but reassured her followers that it’s ‘not serious.’

Health: The blonde beauty previously had surgery in September to remove a lump after a biopsy revealed it had gown in size

Health: The blonde beauty previously had surgery in September to remove a lump after a biopsy revealed it had gown in size

The star explained she previously had the lump checked by doctors, who reassured her that it was benign and non-harmful.

She told her fans: ‘I basically noticed a little lump in my boob, went to get it checked and it was completely fine, completely benign.

‘It’s a little thing called a fibroadenoma and it’s a normal thing to get at this age, small lumps can happen all the time it doesn’t mean they’re sinister.’ 

Molly-Mae then told fans she’d begun to notice the lump was growing as it became more noticeable on her clothes.

She continued: ‘I went back today to get it checked and it had grown a little bit, again, it doesn’t mean it’s sinister, it doesn’t mean it’s dramatic, so the doctor recommended that we did a biopsy.

‘It was not very nice actually considering I’m afraid of needles, but I thought there’s not really a way around this.

‘I promise it’s nothing serious, I don’t want it to be a massive thing. I think it’s important that I share this with you guys.

‘It’s an important subject and we should all be checking our boobs and checking for lumps so we can do things like this.’ 

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and affects more than two MILLION women a year

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Each year in the UK there are more than 55,000 new cases, and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women. In the US, it strikes 266,000 each year and kills 40,000. But what causes it and how can it be treated?

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer develops from a cancerous cell which develops in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the breasts.

When the breast cancer has spread into surrounding breast tissue it is called an ‘invasive’ breast cancer. Some people are diagnosed with ‘carcinoma in situ’, where no cancer cells have grown beyond the duct or lobule.

Most cases develop in women over the age of 50 but younger women are sometimes affected. Breast cancer can develop in men though this is rare.

Staging means how big the cancer is and whether it has spread. Stage 1 is the earliest stage and stage 4 means the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

The cancerous cells are graded from low, which means a slow growth, to high, which is fast growing. High grade cancers are more likely to come back after they have first been treated.

What causes breast cancer?

A cancerous tumour starts from one abnormal cell. The exact reason why a cell becomes cancerous is unclear. It is thought that something damages or alters certain genes in the cell. This makes the cell abnormal and multiply ‘out of control’.

Although breast cancer can develop for no apparent reason, there are some risk factors that can increase the chance of developing breast cancer, such as genetics.

What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The usual first symptom is a painless lump in the breast, although most breast lumps are not cancerous and are fluid filled cysts, which are benign. 

The first place that breast cancer usually spreads to is the lymph nodes in the armpit. If this occurs you will develop a swelling or lump in an armpit.

How is breast cancer diagnosed?

  • Initial assessment: A doctor examines the breasts and armpits. They may do tests such as a mammography, a special x-ray of the breast tissue which can indicate the possibility of tumours.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy is when a small sample of tissue is removed from a part of the body. The sample is then examined under the microscope to look for abnormal cells. The sample can confirm or rule out cancer.

If you are confirmed to have breast cancer, further tests may be needed to assess if it has spread. For example, blood tests, an ultrasound scan of the liver or a chest x-ray.

How is breast cancer treated?

Treatment options which may be considered include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone treatment. Often a combination of two or more of these treatments are used.

  • Surgery: Breast-conserving surgery or the removal of the affected breast depending on the size of the tumour.
  • Radiotherapy: A treatment which uses high energy beams of radiation focussed on cancerous tissue. This kills cancer cells, or stops cancer cells from multiplying. It is mainly used in addition to surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: A treatment of cancer by using anti-cancer drugs which kill cancer cells, or stop them from multiplying
  • Hormone treatments: Some types of breast cancer are affected by the ‘female’ hormone oestrogen, which can stimulate the cancer cells to divide and multiply. Treatments which reduce the level of these hormones, or prevent them from working, are commonly used in people with breast cancer.

How successful is treatment?

The outlook is best in those who are diagnosed when the cancer is still small, and has not spread. Surgical removal of a tumour in an early stage may then give a good chance of cure.

The routine mammography offered to women between the ages of 50 and 70 mean more breast cancers are being diagnosed and treated at an early stage.

For more information visit breastcancercare.org.uk, breastcancernow.org or www.cancerhelp.org.uk

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