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Motorists who listen to music could disrupting harmony on Britain's roads


Motorists who listen to music while driving could be disrupting the harmony on Britain’s roads, according to new research by road safety charity

There’s nothing like a singalong to keep boredom at bay when driving. 

But motorists who do listen to music while driving could be disrupting the harmony on Britain’s roads, says new research by leading independent road safety charity IAM RoadSmart (­iamroadsmart.com). 

Its survey of 1,004 motorists revealed that two-thirds (69 per cent) of drivers believe listening to loud music while driving can be distracting. 

Singalong: IAM RoadSmart's survey of 1,004 motorists revealed that two-thirds of drivers believe listening to loud music while driving can be distracting

Singalong: IAM RoadSmart’s survey of 1,004 motorists revealed that two-thirds of drivers believe listening to loud music while driving can be distracting

And more than a third (36 per cent) believe it has an impact on how fast they drive. 

Nevertheless, 89 per cent of respondents stated they listen to music while driving, though two-thirds (62 per cent) said they turned it off when confused or stressed. 

The findings follow Department for Transport figures revealing that distracted drivers were a factor in 16,333 road incidents in 2021. 

Dogs more relaxed in electric vehicles than diesel cars

Dogs are more relaxed in electric vehicles than diesel cars, research by the University of Lincoln reveals. 

In the study for website Car Gurus, involving 20 pets, each was taken on two ten-minute drives on the same route in an EV then a diesel. 

Sitting pretty: Dogs are more relaxed in electric vehicles than diesel cars, research by the University of Lincoln reveals

Sitting pretty: Dogs are more relaxed in electric vehicles than diesel cars, research by the University of Lincoln reveals

Daniel Mills, Professor of Veterinary Behavioural Medicine at Lincoln, said the dogs lay down for about a third of each journey, regardless of the powertrain, yet in diesel cars dogs got up an average 50 per cent more than when in an electric vehicle — probably due to the differences in noise and vibration in the two types of cars. 

He also found dogs showing signs of car sickness had notably reduced symptoms in an EV, demonstrated by changes in behaviour and the fact their ‘heart rates fell by up to 30 per cent when travelling in an EV’.

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