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Myleene Klass details plans to change UK laws so women will receive swifter miscarriage medical help


Myleene Klass has revealed she’s intent on changing UK laws to ensure that women won’t be forced to experience up to three miscarriages before receiving medical help.

The TV personality, 43, previously claimed she couldn’t speak about her four tragedies for a whole year in a recent heart-wrenching documentary, and has now admitted she will ‘never forget or get over’ them.

She’s ‘hopeful’ to get a new bill passed but confessed it is ‘taking forever as most things do when it comes to government’, before letting slip that she’s in talks with new Freeview channel W to bring ‘more’ to audiences on the deeply personal topic.

'I'll never forget or get over my own tragedies': Myleene Klass has detailed her plans to change UK laws so women won't need to experience three miscarriages before receiving medical help

‘I’ll never forget or get over my own tragedies’: Myleene Klass has detailed her plans to change UK laws so women won’t need to experience three miscarriages before receiving medical help

Speaking to MailOnline and other press at the network’s spring launch party, she said: ‘We are talking with W… that’s all I can say… there’s more coming.

‘If I disappear off the planet tomorrow, I’ve done my bit. I’ve got beautiful babies and they’re gonna know that I marched to Parliament with the likes of Olivia Blake [MP].

‘It’s taken forever as most things do when it comes to government but we’re changing the law so that no woman will have to hear, “You’re going to have this experience two more times, three times in total before we look into it.”

‘So we will hopefully get that bill passed. We’re in the second quarter so who knows what W and me are gonna do about it.

Strong: The TV personality, 43, previously admitted she couldn't speak about her four tragedies for a whole year in a recent heart-wrenching documentary

Strong: The TV personality, 43, previously admitted she couldn’t speak about her four tragedies for a whole year in a recent heart-wrenching documentary

‘It’s not just about telling a story, it’s about putting your money where your mouth is. We took this to the Houses of Parliament.

‘When that bill passes, I’ll be there and I’m bringing a tribe with me. There are lots of women out there who haven’t got the voice at the moment.’

The former Hear’Say bandmember went on to confess that she will ‘never forget or get over’ her own miscarriages.

She continued: ‘It’s not even sensationalising it, it’s telling the truth. There’s not a woman who will tell you that its something you ever forget.

Upsetting: She's now 'hopeful' to get a new bill passed but admitted it is 'taking forever as most things do when it comes to government'

Upsetting: She’s now ‘hopeful’ to get a new bill passed but admitted it is ‘taking forever as most things do when it comes to government’

‘It’s not something you ever get over, you get over the grief around it but it’s not something you ever get over, ever.’ 

Myleene was lauded last year for lifting the lid on her mental health battle following the ordeal, in which she experienced ‘grief, trauma, sadness and fear’.

‘I lost a lot of me,’ she admitted in the eye-opening film. ‘I couldn’t talk about it for a year, I couldn’t even say the word.

‘It is one word, but it is grief, it is trauma, it is sadness, it is fear. There must be a reason people can’t say it,’ she questioned.

The radio DJ is now encouraging others to speak about their pregnancy losses, in order to normalise the experience.

‘I’ve got my group of friends and you know they’ve been through the same, we literally pass that miscarriage baton,’ she said.

‘It is harder for me to find friends who have not had miscarriages now.

‘The change I’d like to see being made is already being made. The fact that we are having these conversations: I couldn’t even say the word ‘miscarriage’ before.

Opening up: The singer soon let slip that she's in talks with new Freeview channel W to bring 'more' to audiences on the important topic

Opening up: The singer soon let slip that she’s in talks with new Freeview channel W to bring ‘more’ to audiences on the important topic 

‘I’ve got my partner talking to his two mates around the table about this. I’ve had friends’ husbands messaging me saying, ‘I was so broken.’

‘But it is important. There are people taking their lives because of this. It can put pressure on relationships. The PTSD that some women suffer is the equivalent of a soldier returning from war.’

The star revealed that she holds family chats with her fiancé Simon Motson, 46, along with their daughters Ava, 14, and Hero, 10, while keeping things age-relevant for the children.

She said: ‘I think it’s important because these conversations are going on in my house, and I wanted to show that you’re not reckless by bringing your children into this.

Force for good: The radio DJ is now encouraging others to speak about their pregnancy losses, in order to normalise the experience (pictured in 2021)

Force for good: The radio DJ is now encouraging others to speak about their pregnancy losses, in order to normalise the experience (pictured in 2021)

‘The conversations I have with my children are very honest, not scary, because you talk about the pure biology.’

It was last October when Myleene first revealed she had suffered four miscarriages before giving birth to her ‘rainbow baby’ son Apollo.

She told how she is a ‘mama to seven babies’ – including ‘four little stars in the sky’ – as she took to Instagram to share her experience on National Baby Loss Miscarriage Day.

The broadcaster explained that model Chrissy Teigen, who lost her baby son Jack halfway through her pregnancy last month, gave her ‘the courage to write’ about what she went through.

Exciting: Speaking to MailOnline and other press at the network's spring launch party, she said: 'We are talking with W… that's all I can say... there's more coming' (pictured on Thursday)

Exciting: Speaking to MailOnline and other press at the network’s spring launch party, she said: ‘We are talking with W… that’s all I can say… there’s more coming’ (pictured on Thursday)

While Myleene could fall pregnant, there was ‘no explanation’ for why she couldn’t carry her babies to term, so when she was expecting Apollo, doctors ‘took no chances’ and gave her ‘countless, endless hormones’ to keep the placenta working.

Alongside two photos of her bump during her pregnancies, she wrote on Instagram on Wednesday: ‘I am Mama to 7 babies, Ava, Hero, Apollo my rainbow baby and 4 little stars in the sky.

‘I know after my own MC’s (miscarriages) how I scoured the internet for stories similar to mine for peace, reassurance. I hope this helps even one lost soul.’

Myleene said she suffered her first miscarriage when she was at the airport, flying home for a dilation and curettage procedure, which is often performed after a first-trimester miscarriage.

She explained: ‘I’d started bleeding heavily at 10wks on holiday. The scan was the saddest sight I’ve ever seen in my life. The first and last time I saw my baby.

‘As the doctor pushed the camera on my belly, the familiar black and blue image of my baby sprung onto the screen, then started to sink and slowly floated down, til it just hunched over.

‘I knew. ‘I’m sorry there’s no heartbeat’.’

Myleene said she was asked to confirm the procedure, but ‘cried so hard’, a nurse had to answer on her behalf.

Candid: It was last October when Myleene first revealed she had suffered four miscarriages before giving birth to her 'rainbow baby' son Apollo

Candid: It was last October when Myleene first revealed she had suffered four miscarriages before giving birth to her ‘rainbow baby’ son Apollo

‘The feeling is nothing short of traumatic, shock,’ she said. ‘They taped my bracelet to my wrist, two gold swallows. It made me sob. Swallows love for life and always come home.

‘I told the anaesthetist to please make sure I wake up as I’m a mum then I cried again at what they were going to take out. I woke to emptiness and the horror of what had happened.

‘I felt I’d failed my baby and my partner.’

The Pure And Simple songstress described her second miscarriage as ‘worse if that’s possible’ because she like she already had her ‘one in four’ experience – referring to the one in four women who suffer baby loss.

Her story: She told how she is a 'mama to seven babies' - including 'four little stars in the sky' - as she took to Instagram to share her experience

Her story: She told how she is a ‘mama to seven babies’ – including ‘four little stars in the sky’ – as she took to Instagram to share her experience

She said her baby stopped growing at 10 weeks, but for reasons completely unrelated to her first miscarriage.

Reliving the trauma, Myleene said: ‘I didn’t take my eyes off the fire alarm on the ceiling, lest I break completely. Walking past the pregnant women in reception was torture.

‘This D&C was no less traumatic. In fact, the familiarity of it cut deeper. The ‘wishes to dispose of the products of pregnancy’ form, the walking to theatre, the ugly socks. Having everything one minute, a name, a school, then nothing.

‘The third, I miscarried at work. The fourth, the loo. Whilst I could get pregnant, there was no explanation for why I couldn’t keep them.’

When Myleene became pregnant with her gorgeous son Apollo, doctors ‘took no chances’.

The Dancing On Ice contestant explained how she injected herself with ‘countless, endless hormones into my belly to keep my placenta working.’

Speaking of her rainbow baby, Myleene said: ‘He signifies everything good in the world to me, my miracle.

‘To my friends and Mamas who have experienced this, you are the strongest women I know. Thinking of you today.’

If you have been affected by this story, you can seek advice at www.miscarriageassociation.org.uk or by calling 01924 200 799.

The W Channel is moving to Freeview (channel 25) and Freesat (channel 125) from March 28. 

Baby joy: Myleene alluded to her trauma in this post in August last year: 'Will never get over or take for granted the miracle of growing and carrying a child!  (and yes, I’m STILL pregnant!)'

Baby joy: Myleene alluded to her trauma in this post in August last year: ‘Will never get over or take for granted the miracle of growing and carrying a child!  (and yes, I’m STILL pregnant!)’

What causes a miscarriage?

It is highly unlikely that you will ever know the actual cause of a one-off miscarriage, but most are due to the following problems:

ABNORMAL FETUS

The most common cause of miscarriages in the first couple of months is a one-off abnormal development in the fetus, often due to chromosome anomalies. ‘It’s not as though the baby is fine one minute and suddenly dies the next,’ says Professor James Walker, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Leeds. 

‘These pregnancies fail from the outset and were never destined to succeed.’ Most miscarriages like this happen by eight weeks, although bleeding may not start until three or four weeks later, which is worth remembering in subsequent pregnancies. ‘If a scan at eight weeks shows a healthy heart beat, you have a 95 per cent chance of a successful pregnancy,’ says Professor Walker.

HORMONAL FACTORS

A hormonal blip could cause a sporadic miscarriage and never be a problem again. However, a small number of women who have long cycles and irregular periods may suffer recurrent miscarriages because the lining of the uterus is too thin, making implantation difficult. 

Unfortunately, hormone treatment is not terribly successful. 

‘There used to be a trend for progesterone treatment, but trials show this really doesn’t work,’ warns Professor Walker. ‘There is some evidence that injections of HCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin, a hormone released in early pregnancy) can help, but it’s not the answer for everyone.’ The treatment must be started as soon as the pregnancy is confirmed, at around four or five weeks.

AGE 

For women over 40, one in four women who become pregnant will miscarry. [One in four women of all ages miscarry, but these figures include women who don’t know that they are pregnant. Of women who do know that they’re pregnant, the figure is one in six. Once you’re over 40, and know that you’re pregnant, the figure rises to one in four]

AUTO-IMMUNE BLOOD DISORDERS

Around 20 per cent of recurrent miscarriers suffer from lupus or a similar auto-immune disorder that causes blood clots to form in the developing placenta. 

A simple blood test, which may need to be repeated several times, can reveal whether or not this is the problem.’One negative test does not mean that a women is okay,’ warns Mr Roy Farquharson, consultant gynaecologist who runs an early pregnancy unit at the Liverpool Women’s Hospital. 

Often pregnancy can be a trigger for these disorders, so a test should be done as soon as possible,’ he adds.But it can easily be treated with low dose aspirin or heparin injections, which help to thin the blood and prevent blood clots forming – a recent trial also showed that women do equally well on either. ”We have a 70 per cent live birth rate in women treated for these disorders,’ says Dr Farquharson, ‘which is excellent.’

OTHER CAUSES

While uterine abnormalities, such as fibroids, can cause a miscarriage, many women have no problems carrying a pregnancy to term. An incompetent cervix can also cause miscarriage at around 20 weeks. 

While this can be treated by a special stitch in the cervix, trials suggest it is not particularly successful, although it may delay labour by a few weeks.Gene and chromosomal abnormalities, which can be detected by blood tests, may also cause recurrent miscarriages in a small number of couples. 

A procedure known as preimplantation genetic diagnosis can help. After in-vitro fertilisation (IVF), a single cell is taken from the developing embryo and tested for the gene defect. Only healthy embryos are then replaced in the womb.

 It is an expensive and stressful procedure – and pregnancy rates tend to be quite low – but for some this is preferable to repeated miscarriages or a genetically abnormal baby.

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