Ray Fisher confirms he’s been ‘removed’ from The Flash amid Warner Bros battle


Ray Fisher has confirmed he’s been “removed” from a forthcoming The Flash movie, and offered to take a polygraph test in his ongoing feud with Warner Bros.

Fisher, who portrayed superhero Cyborg in the DC Universe franchise, has publicly condemned Warner Bros since last year over allegations of “abusive” behaviour on the set of the 2017’s Justice League.

Fisher has since turned his attention to Walter Hamada, the president of DC Films. Last month, Fisher said that he would not participate in any DC Films project as long as Hamada ran the studio. “Walter Hamada is the most dangerous kind of enabler,” Fisher alleged in a tweet.

On Wednesday (13 January), Fisher confirmed that he would not be a part of The Flash.

“I have received official confirmation that Warner Bros Pictures has decided to remove me from the cast of The Flash,” Fisher wrote in a lengthy statement posted on his Twitter. “I strongly disagree with their decision, but it is one that is unsurprising.”

He added that Cyborg’s original involvement in The Flash “was much larger than a cameo”, and that he was disappointed by the move. He argued, however, that his battle against Hamada would “prove to be a much more important contribution to our world”.

Fisher subsequently accused Hamada of “enabling” the unspecified events that he alleges occurred on the Justice League set. Specifically, Fisher claims he experienced “blatant racism” while working on the film.

“I maintain that Walter Hamada is unfit for a position of leadership,” Fisher added, “and I am willing, at any point, to submit to a polygraph test to support my claims against him. If the end of my time as Cyborg is the cost for helping to bring awareness and accountability to Walter Hamada’s actions – I’ll pay it gladly.”

Ray Fisher as Cyborg in Justice League

(Warner Bros)

Fisher concluded his statement by quoting educator and activist Mamie Till-Mobley, whose 14-year-old son Emmett was murdered by racists in 1955.

The Independent has reached out to WarnerMedia for comment.

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