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HomeTv & ShowScott Cam admits most viewers can't afford the homes on The Block

Scott Cam admits most viewers can't afford the homes on The Block


The Block host Scott Cam has admitted most viewers aren’t able to afford the homes that are renovated on the Channel Nine show.

But the veteran tradie, 59, said fans are still able to pick up home improvement tips and tricks from the contestants, even without the same eye-watering budget.

The most expensive home from last year’s season went for a huge $4.4million; when The Block premiered in 2003, the top price was $751,000. 

The Block host Scott Cam (pictured) has admitted most viewers aren't able to afford the homes that are renovated on the Channel Nine show

The Block host Scott Cam (pictured) has admitted most viewers aren’t able to afford the homes that are renovated on the Channel Nine show 

The latest season has seen couples renovate homes in country Victoria, with some adding tennis courts, vineyards and 10 acres of land before auction.

‘At the end of the day, I think people want to see something luxe, so they can take something from that,’ Scott told TV Tonight.

‘Possibly they might not be able to afford that actual home, but they might be able to take something out of that home to put into theirs that they can afford.

‘It’s all about creating some visions for people so they go, “I love that kitchen. The house is too big for me, but I want to put that kitchen into my home, or that bedroom.”‘

The most expensive home from last year's season went for a huge $4.4million; when The Block premiered in 2003, the top price was $751,000. (Here: a luxury dining space from the show)

The most expensive home from last year’s season went for a huge $4.4million; when The Block premiered in 2003, the top price was $751,000. (Here: a luxury dining space from the show) 

‘And of course, everybody wants to see a beautiful big home, on 10 acres for example in this case, that they can aspire to and go, “One day, I’d love to get that.”‘

It comes after Scott revealed his retirement plans in an interview with Daily Mail Australia.

‘I’m 60 this year and I’m physically fit. I’m doing a renovation of my home now because of the mould from all the rain,’ he said. 

‘I’ve got at least another decade on the tools. I told my wife recently, “We’ve got 20 years of good health left so from January 1, let’s start a 20-year odyssey of living life.”

It comes after Scott revealed his retirement plans in an interview with Daily Mail Australia

It comes after Scott revealed his retirement plans in an interview with Daily Mail Australia 

‘I’ll keep going until I can’t anymore because I love it. I reckon I can do 20 years on the tools, and I’ll pull up when my body tells me to.’ 

Scott was rushed to hospital in 2020 after his neck ‘gave way’ after decades of wear and tear with a disc ‘blow-out’ that crushed a major nerve.

‘When I hurt my neck, I thought, “Is that my working life over?”, and it was a real mental strain thinking I may not be able to work again, it was really upsetting. ‘At 57 I still had plenty of life left in me,’ he said.

‘I wasn’t even allowed to lift 1kg for eight weeks after the operation, I was lucky a schooner [of beer[ only weighs 750g, I’d have been in real trouble.

Scott said building sites were far safer today than earlier in his career (pictured) when workers suffered many more injuries - including 'terrible' ones he witnessed

Scott said building sites were far safer today than earlier in his career (pictured) when workers suffered many more injuries – including ‘terrible’ ones he witnessed

‘So I’ve seen first hand when an injury can affect a young guy or girl who wants to be physically active [not just at work].’

After the three-hour emergency surgery, Scott described the pain as a ’12 out of 10′, both in his neck and his arm where the nerve was hit.

‘I said to my wife, “You’re going to have to call an ambulance because I’m going to pass out here.” It’s like my arm was on fire. I couldn’t get rid of it,’ he said at the time.

He said the injury should be a wake up call for young tradies that they need to look after themselves so they don’t have a poor quality of life decades later.

Scott said The Block hadn't had a serious injury to a contestant or one of hundreds of tradies working alongside them in its 16-year history

Scott said The Block hadn’t had a serious injury to a contestant or one of hundreds of tradies working alongside them in its 16-year history

‘Don’t try to be a hero – as we all were – and carry six sticks of timber. Carry four and just look after your body, and then you can keep working till you’re 60,’ he said.

Young tradies impaled on steel bars, broken bones, severed fingers, and his own brother’s bicep run through by a huge stray nail are just some of the ‘terrible’ injuries he’s seen on building sites.

Scott said building sites were far safer today than earlier in his career, and the home improvement series hadn’t had a serious injury in its 16-year history.

Scott was rushed to hospital in 2020 after his neck 'gave way' after decades of wear and tear with a disc 'blow-out' that crushed a major nerve (pictured on The Block)

Scott was rushed to hospital in 2020 after his neck ‘gave way’ after decades of wear and tear with a disc ‘blow-out’ that crushed a major nerve (pictured on The Block) 

‘Construction is quite a dangerous job, 100 years ago people were dying every day and that’s slowly improved,’ he said.

The veteran tradie said workers like him were ‘a bull at the gate’ and safety wasn’t as much of an issue when he was a young carpenter.

‘There’s a photo of me on a slate roof five floors up on a block of units in Stanmore – I was there for two weeks, no harnesses, no nothing,’ he said.

‘If I slipped I was dead for sure, there was a concrete driveway below.

Scott plans to be hammering away on building sites for decades to come despite a serious injury almost ending his career

Scott plans to be hammering away on building sites for decades to come despite a serious injury almost ending his career

‘It wasn’t that people didn’t care, but there was a job to be done and you just got on with it.’

Scott’s worst accident was cutting off the top of his finger with a bandsaw, but it was able to be sewn back on again. His brother wasn’t so lucky and lost his for good.

‘I’m lucky in that I’ve never seen anyone die or break their back, but I’ve seen some serious injuries like rebars going through people when they fell over, terrible things,’ he said.

‘I’ve seen plenty of fingers go missing, mine included, and my brother had a six-inch nail through his bicep from a swinging bit of timber. I had to pull it out too.’

'I told my wife recently, we've got 20 years of good health left so from January 1, let's start a 20-year odyssey of living life,' Scott told Daily Mail Australia

‘I told my wife recently, we’ve got 20 years of good health left so from January 1, let’s start a 20-year odyssey of living life,’ Scott told Daily Mail Australia

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