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The Bachelorette's Brooke Blurton doesn't want to be 'undermined as just this reality TV girl'


She’s become a household name, having starred on Nick Cummins’ season of The Bachelor in 2018 and as Australia’s first bisexual Bachelorette last year.

However speaking to The Sunday Telegraph’s Stellar magazine, Brooke Blurton, who previously worked as a youth worker before finding fame, revealed her next chapter will see her focusing more on advocacy work.

‘I’m definitely heading more in that direction. I don’t want to be undermined as just this reality TV girl,’ the 27-year-old told the publication.

'I don't want to be undermined as just this reality TV girl': The Bachelorette's Brooke Blurton (pictured), 27, revealed to The Sunday Telegraph's Stellar magazine that she's heading down the path of advocacy work

‘I don’t want to be undermined as just this reality TV girl’: The Bachelorette’s Brooke Blurton (pictured), 27, revealed to The Sunday Telegraph’s Stellar magazine that she’s heading down the path of advocacy work

‘I actually do have a lot of opinions around important issues. I feel excited about what’s around the corner,’ Brooke continued.

Identifying as a proud Noongar-Yamatji woman from Western Australia, Brooke’s next chapter will see her releasing a memoir titled Big Love in October.

The memoir will detail her traumatic childhood marred by sexual assault, drug-fuelled violence and her mother’s suicide when she was just 11. 

Using her voice: Brooke, who previously worked as a youth worker before finding fame on the dating franchise, is set to release a memoir titled Big Love in October that will detail her traumatic childhood including her mother's suicide when she was just 11

Using her voice: Brooke, who previously worked as a youth worker before finding fame on the dating franchise, is set to release a memoir titled Big Love in October that will detail her traumatic childhood including her mother’s suicide when she was just 11

Changing perceptions: 'Everything you thought of me and everything you assumed of me is probably completely incorrect. When the book is done, it's going to be like a breath of fresh air,' Brooke told Stellar

Changing perceptions: ‘Everything you thought of me and everything you assumed of me is probably completely incorrect. When the book is done, it’s going to be like a breath of fresh air,’ Brooke told Stellar

‘Everything you thought of me and everything you assumed of me is probably completely incorrect. When the book is done, it’s going to be like a breath of fresh air,’ she told Stellar. 

Brooke previously discussed her struggles on SBS program Noongar Dandjoo.

‘I grew up in a country town in Carnarvon. I spent my childhood there up until I was about 11, when my mum unfortunately passed away – she committed suicide,’ she said.

'Growing up was pretty complicated': Brooke previously discussed her struggles on SBS program Noongar Dandjoo. 'I grew up in a country town in Carnarvon. I spent my childhood there up until I was about 11, when my mum unfortunately passed away - she committed suicide,' she said. Pictured: Brooke, her mother and her siblings in an undated photo

‘Growing up was pretty complicated’: Brooke previously discussed her struggles on SBS program Noongar Dandjoo. ‘I grew up in a country town in Carnarvon. I spent my childhood there up until I was about 11, when my mum unfortunately passed away – she committed suicide,’ she said. Pictured: Brooke, her mother and her siblings in an undated photo

‘That was a hard time, living in Carnarvon with my mum and nan, losing mum, and then nan actually passed away a month later.’

Brooke eventually went to live with her father, but admitted: ‘To be honest, he wasn’t that supportive.’

‘Growing up was pretty complicated. [There was] a lot of drug and alcohol violence in my childhood and I had an older sister who suffered from schizophrenia,’ she added.

Struggles: Brooke's life before fame was anything but a fairytale (pictured with her family)

Struggles: Brooke’s life before fame was anything but a fairytale (pictured with her family)

Her brother Troy told the program: ‘Brooke was definitely someone I had to run to when I had problems.

‘I went through quite a bit of depression when I was on drugs, drinking a lot, wasn’t really in the right place.’ 

Brooke also discussed her tough upbringing in a TedX talk in 2019, revealing she was sexually assaulted after her mother’s funeral.

'I don't remember how I processed that information or how I was feeling at that time': Brooke also discussed her tough upbringing in a TedX talk in 2019, revealing she was sexually assaulted after her mother's funeral

‘I don’t remember how I processed that information or how I was feeling at that time’: Brooke also discussed her tough upbringing in a TedX talk in 2019, revealing she was sexually assaulted after her mother’s funeral 

‘I don’t remember how I processed that information or how I was feeling at that time, but what I do remember is I found a phone book and a house phone and I looked up my dad’s name, I found a number and dialled,’ she said.

‘My stepmother answered, and I didn’t tell her what had happened, I just said, “Could you come get me?”‘ 

Brooke’s father, who was living in Perth, picked her up a day later.  

Role model: Despite the horrors of her childhood, Brooke found the strength to push through her own mental health issues to become a role model for her siblings. Pictured: Brooke with her brother Troy

Role model: Despite the horrors of her childhood, Brooke found the strength to push through her own mental health issues to become a role model for her siblings. Pictured: Brooke with her brother Troy

‘I left in the middle of the night that night and I didn’t say goodbye to my brothers. I pretty much left my home,’ she recalled.

‘I felt like I’d lost everything at that moment. I’d lost my sense of belonging, my family, my mum and also my connection to my Aboriginality. This was when I had first ever thought of suicide.’

Despite the horrors of her childhood, Brooke found the strength to push through her own mental health issues to become a role model for her siblings.    

Lifeline crisis support number: 13 11 14. www.lifeline.org.au. Suicide Call Back Service: 1300 659 467

Interview: Brooke's full interview with Stellar is featured in this weekend's The Sunday Telegraph

Interview: Brooke’s full interview with Stellar is featured in this weekend’s The Sunday Telegraph

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